China and the Future of the Internet

The 19th Chinese Internet Research Conference
23 - 24 May 2022
Virtual Conference (HKT; UTC +8)
School of Communication and Film, Hong Kong Baptist University




PROGRAM

CIRC 2022 Full Program PDF Download 

Day 1 23 May (Monday) 2022

Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 09:00 – 09:20
London, BST (UTC +1) | 02:00 – 02:20
New York, EDT (UTC -4) | (22 May) 21:00 – 21:20
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (22 May) 18:00 – 18:20
Opening: Welcoming to CIRC 2022
Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 09:30 – 10:50
London, BST (UTC +1) | 02:30 – 03:50
New York, EDT (UTC -4) | (22 May) 21:30 – 22:50
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (22 May) 18:30 – 19:50
Keynote Speech: Adding Evidence-based Evaluation (EbE) to Research on Chinese Internet Research

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Jonathan Jian-Hua Zhu, City University of Hong Kong


Abstract
Research on Chinese Internet research (CIR) has become increasingly popular around the world. What should, and could, we do to move our research community to a more centralized position in the field of Internet research at large? Among numerous possibilities, I would like to call for more evidence-based evaluation (EbE) on CIR. EbE appears self-contradictory because evidence-based research refers to empirical studies, which are largely value-free, whereas evaluative research involves subjective judgments. There have been no lack of evidence-based studies, nor lack of evaluations, on CIR. However, the two approaches are largely disconnected, which affects the quality and impact of both. With EbE, we strive for empirical studies with an evaluative objective or evaluative studies based on vigorous evidence. When seriously and carefully done, EbE is likely to make CIR not popular but also influential and respected.

Bio
Jonathan Zhu (PhD in Mass Communication, Indiana University, 1990) is currently a Chair Professor of Computational Social Science in Department of Media & Communication and School of Data Science at City University, where he teaches communication theory, quantitative research methods, and computational social science and directs Centre for Communication Research. He has served on editorial board of Journal of Communication, Communication Research, Human Communication Research, Political Communication, Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, and others, and a Fellow of International Communication Association.

Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 11:00 – 12:20
London, BST (UTC +1) | 04:00 – 05:20
New York, EDT (UTC -4) | (22 May) 23:00 – (23 May) 00:20
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (22 May) 20:00 – 21:20
Panel 1: Chinese-language Fact-checking in the Digital Age

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Chair: Stephanie Tsang, Hong Kong Baptist University

  1. How to investigate truth in the online space: An example from the practice by fact checkers in Nanjing University. Junyi Chen, Ling Lin and Yiwen Deng, Nanjing University

    標題: 如何在眾聲喧嘩的網路空間里探尋真相? ——以校園媒體“核真錄”的實踐為例。 核真錄社會時政組責編陳俊沂、研究中心責編林凌和媒介質量評估責編鄧譯文

  2. Fact-checking and Journalism Innovation in International News Reporting: A Case Study of Fact Paper. Nan Lyu, Shanghai International Studies University and Yiqing Li, The Paper

    標題: 國際新聞事實核查與新聞創新:以澎湃明查為例。上海外國語大學新聞傳播學院助理教授呂楠、澎湃明查負責人李怡清

  3. The challenge of fact-checking: How to use artificial intelligence to identify and debunk misinformation. Ping-I Chen. Institute for Information Industry, Taiwan

    標題: 真相大考驗─從人工智能技術談謠言快篩與破解。台灣財團法人資訊工業策進會數位服務創新研究所/數位服務研發中心組長陳棅易博士

Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 12:20 – 13:20
London, BST (UTC +1) | 05:20 – 06:20
New York, EDT (UTC -4) | (23 May) 00:20 – 01:20
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (22 May) 21:20 – 22:20
Lunch Break
Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 13:30 – 14:50
London, BST (UTC +1) | 06:30 – 07:50
New York, EDT (UTC -4) | (23 May) 01:30 – 02:50
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (22 May) 22:30 –23:50
Panel 2: Internet Technology, Environment, and Health

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Chair: Jingyuang Wang, Hong Kong Baptist University

  1. Mediatized governance in environmental disaster: The rescue by an open-source document. Chenghao Ji, Zhejiang University of Finance & Economics
  2. "Try Low Carbon Life" for "Planting Trees Together": Defining online pro-environmental behaviors in Ant Forest. Tong Tong, Tsinghua University
  3. Online communicative actions for uncertainty management: A study of Chinese immigrants in Hong Kong when facing the policy change. Yu Wu and Qiqi Li, Hong Kong Baptist University
  4. Multimodal social media connectedness on psychological wellbeing on Chinese emerging adulthood: Examining the mediating role of fear of missing out and leisure boredom. Biying Wu and Jindong Liu, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  5. Aging in cyberspace: Understanding the roles of social influence factors and personal factors on online health information behaviors among older adults. Wenshu LI, Hong Kong Baptist University
  6. Power hopeless individuals’ future with parasocial interaction on short-form video: A moderated mediation model. Yanjun Lin, Peking university
Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 15:00 – 16:20
London, BST (UTC +1) | 08:00 – 09:20
New York, EDT (UTC -4) | (23 May) 03:00 – 04:20
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (23 May) 00:00 – 01:20
Panel 3: Global Perspectives on Chinese Internet

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Chair: Daya Thussu, Hong Kong Baptist University

  1. China and ITU: A short history of standards. Gianluigi Negro, Siena University, Italy
  2. The great rectification: A new regulatory approach for China’s digital economy. Rogier Creemers, Leiden University, Netherlands
  3. Construction of a restricted sphere for public discourse? Conflictualisation and fragmentation in the mediatization of Chinese nationalism. Zhuoran Ma, Université Grenoble Alpes, France
  4. ‘Anti-national’ TikTok: India-China conflict and the coverage of the ban on the world’s most popular app in India. Anilesh Kumar, Hong Kong Baptist University
  5. A systematic and thematic review of Chinese internet studies in SSCI communication journals, 2010-2021. Vincent Huang, Hong Kong Baptist University

Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 16:30 – 17:50
London, BST (UTC +1) | 09:30 – 10:50
New York, EDT (UTC -4) | (23 May) 04:30 – 05:50
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (23 May) 01:30 – 02:50
Panel 4: The Digital Silk Road Between Internet Sovereignty and Globalization Imperatives

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Chair: Elisa Oreglia, King’s College London, UK

  1. Cross-border firm collaboration in the implementation of the Digital Silk Road: A multi-scalar study. Oyuna Baldakova, King’s College London, UK
  2. Going out or digital sovereignty? Tensions within China’s Globalising Internet. Weidi Zheng, King’s College London, UK
  3. Seeking truth from facts: Studying the globalizing Chinese internet with digital methods. Elisa Oreglia and James Burroughs, King's College London, UK
  4. Africa’s digital futures: Distinguishing myth from reality in the competition between alternative Internet models. Iginio Gagliardone, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa
  5. A western reading of Chinese AI policy: Regaining what is lost in translation. Freyja van den Boom, Bournemouth University, UK
Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 18:00 – 19:20
London, BST (UTC +1) | 11:00 – 12:20
New York, EDT (UTC -4) | (23 May) 06:00 – 07:20
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (23 May) 03:00 – 04:20
Panel 5: Provincializing Platform Economies: The (Re)making of Power Dynamics and Social Order in China

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Chair: Xiaofei Han, Carleton University, Canada

  1. The Super App Strategy: How Tencent combines platformization, infrastruturization, conglomeration, and financialization in China’s app economy. Lianrui Jia, The University of Sheffield, UK
  2. Platform as new “daddy”: Gendered wanghong economy and patriarchal platforms behind. Xiaofei Han, Carleton University, Canada
  3. To exaggerate data at all costs: The indebted new poor in Chinese data-driven participatory fan culture. Jiaxi Hou, University of Tokyo, Japan
  4. Science skepticism and attitudes toward climate experts in China and India: Through the looking-glasses of video-sharing platforms. Pu Yan, Peking University
  5. The role of state in digital economy: Lessons from mapping ‘digital transformation of governance’ practices and affordances. Yuchao Zhao, Zhejiang Lab


Day 2 24 May (Tuesday) 2022

Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 09:30 – 10:50
London, BST (UTC +1) | 02:30 – 03:50
New York, EDT (UTC -4) | (23 May) 21:30 – 22:50
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (23 May) 18:30 – 19:50
Panel 6: Internet and Digital Economy

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Chair: Vincent Huang, Hong Kong Baptist University

  1. How Chinese internet tech corporations morphed into financial institutions—and back again. Allegra Fonda-Bonardi, University of Michigan, USA
  2. The financialization of the Chinese video game industry. Menglu Lyu, Southern Illinois University, USA
  3. A loose fence: Can the platform advertisement regulation keep influencers from deceiving and misleading? Lin Yutong, Xie Siqi and Li Huiruo, Shenzhen University
  4. The consumers’ perspective on virtual influence: A case study of Ling. Lijun Luo and Wonkyung Kim, Hong Kong Baptist University
  5. Brand response as a remedy: How should brands react to celebrity scandals? Liuliu Yang, Hong Kong Baptist University
Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 11:00 – 12:20
London, BST (UTC +1) | 04:00 – 05:20
New York, EDT (UTC -4) | (23 May) 23:00 – (24 May) 00:20
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (23 May) 20:00 – 21:20
Panel 7: State, Regulation, and Society

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Chair: Xinzhi Zhang, Hong Kong Baptist University

  1. “Serve for traffic”: Theorization of the logic of traffic on the Chinese social media platforms. Changwen Chen, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  2. Techniques of strategic political communication: The persuasive devices of the two most followed political youtubers in the Chinese community. Weidong Wang, University of Southern California, USA
  3. One newspaper, two stories of COVID-19: How the People’s Daily presented the pandemic differently to domestic and international audiences. Mian Wei and Kecheng Fang, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  4. Regional internets: The telecom-led model of internet development in China and Japan. Shuxi Wu, University of Oregon, USA
  5. Evaluating the role of a bespoke civic app as a tool of social governance. Guangbin Lyu, Lanzhou University
Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 12:20 – 13:20
London, BST (UTC +1) | 05:20 – 06:20
New York, EDT (UTC -4) |(24 May) 00:20 – 01:20
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (23 May) 21:20 – 22:20
Lunch Break
Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 13:30 – 14:50
London, BST (UTC +1) | 06:30 – 07:50
New York, EDT (UTC -4) | (24 May) 01:30 – 02:50
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (23 May) 22:30 –23:50
Panel 8: Digital Platform, Content, and Culture

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Chair: Dandan Liu, Hong Kong Baptist University

  1. Observing #MeToo as connective actions: Using social network analysis to examine the public opinion movement on Chinese social media. Gu Rui, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  2. The life and death of an internet subculture: An observation of China’s growing cyber surveillance and clean-up campaigns against online boy’s love community. Weihang Wang, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  3. Commodifying cuteness, Chineseness and cosmopolitanism: Sharenting mixed-blood kids on Douyin. Xinxin Jiang, Southwestern University of Finance and Economics
  4. Instant messengers as socio-cultural emotional and affective spaces. A Chinese case study on the use of emojis and stickers. Yifan Ou and Steven Eggermont, KU Leuven, Belgium
  5. Backstage of a live team selling on Douyin. Shichang Duan, Renmin University of China
  6. Promoting Prestige – The unequal efforts of elite Chinese universities using social media to attract prime candidates. Runping ZHU, Lanzhou University
Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 15:00 – 16:20
London, BST (UTC +1) | 08:00 – 09:20
New York, EDT (UTC -4) | (24 May) 03:00 – 04:20
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (24 May) 00:00 – 01:20
Panel 9: Cross-Platform Analyses of Chinese Internet

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Chair: Weiyu Zhang, National University of Singapore

  1. Developing the Chinese Moral Foundation Dictionary: Theoretical and methodological insights. Calvin Cheng, Oxford Institute of Internet, UK
  2. Moral discourses about celebrity scandals on Chinese social media: A case study. Zhiyuan Liu, Fudan University
  3. Cross-platform practices of Netreds: Li Ziqi as a case. Chuyao Wang, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  4. Comparing journalists’ discourses across social media platforms. Adina Yuetikuer, Fudan University
  5. Discourses about Covid-19 vaccines across platforms. Shaojing Sun, Fudan University and Weiyu Zhang, National University of Singapore
Hong Kong, HKT (UTC +8) | 16:30 – 17:30
London, BST (UTC +1) | 09:30 – 10:30
New York, EDT (UTC -4) | (24 May) 04:30 – 05:30
Los Angles, PDT (UTC -7) | (24 May) 01:30 – 02:30
Closing: Student Paper Award Ceremony


OTHER INFORMATION

Student awards

  • Top Student Papers Awards will be announced at the conference.



Publication opportunity

  • The accepted papers of this conference will be considered to be published in a special issue of cooperated journals, subject to the journal standard review.



ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Organizer



Co-organizers



About the School of Communication and Film

Located in Kowloon, Hong Kong, the School of Communication and Film at HKBU provides a comprehensive range of programs in communication at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels under three academic units: Department of Journalism, Department of Communication Studies, and Academy of Film. Home to some 35 research faculty and 40 PhD Students, the School has been recently rated Hong Kong’s leading institution for communication/media research outputs based on the 2020 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) conducted by the University Grants Committee of Hong Kong.



Organizer Committee

The postal address

School of Communication and Film, 5 Hereford Road, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Kong Hong



Other information

  • No registration fee for the conference will be required
  • The language of the conference will be English
  • Open to the public, without fees, subject to registration in advance



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